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The Tides Inn - Shelter Cove, CA

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Abalone ( 2 )

April 1 is the opening day of abalone season in northern California.

It's the first opportunity in four months for enthusiasts to indulge an irrational need to spend an hour or more wading or diving in unfriendly and frigid coastal waters in hopes of returning home with a few abalone.

Why would anyone brave numbing-cold, potentially dangerous surf, unexpected currents, and rumors of man-eating sharks (spending an estimated $6,000,000 and $10,000,000 every year) for abalone?
  • Presumably it's unlikely that all of the estimated 40,000 recreational abalone harvesters are quite simply nuts, there just might be some reasonable explanation.
     
  • For most, the major part of any explanation lies with the universal appeal of a treasure hunt. If you went to a local seafood market to buy abalone, you'd have to pay something in excess of $100/pound for abalone (assuming you were able to find it at all).
     
  • Each legal-sized abalone yields a pound or more of meat and every abalone harvester may take up to three abalone.
     
  • Even though a ban on the sale of recreationally-harvested abalone sets its intrinsic value to zero, there's still a perceived value for a limit of abalone that starts at $300 and easily goes to $600, $700, $800 or more.
     
  • Where else can you engage in a relatively inexpensive activity that offers valuable treasure just for the taking? It's a powerful inducement for the more adventurous kids of any age.

But, regardless of the appeal of a treasure hunt, there aren't very many who would partake of this sport were it not any fun.

The fact that more and more people are caught up in this minor mania each year attests to the fun involved and, by extension, that the dangers and discomforts of abalone diving can be largely overcome.

All About Shelter Cove ( 1 )

Refresh and Renew Yourself in Shelter Cove

The View: The Tides Inn is wonderfully situated to allow you to experience the beauty, tranquillity, and history of Shelter Cove your way. You can watch the whales and sea otters, or enjoy the sunrises and sunsets, or storm-watch from your own deck.

On Foot: For those who prefer to walk, you can stroll the beaches, visit the restored Cape Mendocino lighthouse, or hike in the nearby King Range which has walks for every level of expertise: "from serene to extreme." A short ride away is the "Avenue of the Giants," redwoods, of course, and the quaint Victorian village of Ferndale is drenched in history, and just a little over an hour away with museums, theatre, mills, and shopping.

From the Air: For the more daring, there is paragliding in our easily accessible hills, and a nearby day-use air strip.

On Sea: Fear not, Fisherfolk, the sea life is plentiful and abundant. Whether you want to fish from right outside your door, tool around in a rented boat, or hire a charter Shelter Cove has it all: salmon, perch, cod, abalone, and crab to name only a few. Bring your wetsuit and snorkel and enjoy yourself in the water, or harvest your limit of abalone for the day.

On the Links: There is nothing to compare to the local golf links with our amazing ocean-front views. The nearby surf shop even rents clubs if you forgot yours at home.

Did we mention: bring your camera and your binoculars!  Everywhere you look is a postcard waiting to be taken and enjoyed. 

If all this is not enough reason to join us at The Tides Inn, how about wineries, shopping, gaming, biking, and dining?

Our coast is called the Lost Coast: come lose yourself in nature's wonder at The Tides Inn, Shelter Cove’s newest Inn, and return home revitalized!

Below are some more articles describing The Tides Inn Experience.

Amenities ( 0 )

A LITTLE ABOUT OUR ROOMS

All of our rooms are oceanfront and have stunning ocean views. Each room is equipped with a microwave, refrigerator/freezer, coffee pot, hair dryer, access to an iron and ironing board, TV with DISH NETWORK, HBO, DVD, and VCR.
 

When you make your reservation, mention birthdays, anniversaries, honeymoons, or special occasions.  We'll put a little something extra in your room.

We have a beautiful full-suite that is a large accommodation with living room, fireplace, balcony, very comfortable queen wall-bed, fully-appointed kitchen (from dishwasher to ice maker to blender), separate king bedroom, large bath, and ocean views from the living room, balcony, and bedroom.  These full-suites are larger than most one-bedroom apartments.

The views from this full-suite take your breath away
(as do all the views from all of our rooms).
The large piece of furniture on the right is the queen wall bed (very comfortable).

 

 
 The king bedroom in the full-suite is large,
Has a full-sized mirrored closet and a
Beautiful view of the ocean.
 

This is the fully-appointed kitchen in the full-suite. 
From dishwasher to ice maker to blender. Everything you'll need.  Bring food 'cause you won't want to ever leave this accommodation. 

Our mini-suites are on the third floor and have a living room with a fireplace and balcony and a separate bedroom and bath.  The view from the third floor balcony is amazing.

We have a standard room with two full (double) beds.  It is on the bottom floor and has a deck with  beautiful views of the ocean.  OR - standard rooms with king beds.  One of these rooms is on the bottom floor and has a walk-in shower that is wheelchair accessible.  The other standard rooms are on the second floor.  The views from all of our standard rooms are incredibly beautiful.


 

 


 

Avenue of the Giants ( 1 )
The Avenue of the Giants

The Avenue of the Giants is a 32 mile scenic road that runs through the Redwoods State Park in Northern California, roughly following U.S. Route 101. The Avenue of the Giants is also referred to as State Route 254.

The southern entrance to the Avenue of the Giants is just north of Garberville, California, and the northern entrance is south of Fortuna, California. The highway is notable for the Redwoods that overshadow the road and surround the area. The Avenue of the Giants actually got its name from these towering trees. The two-lane road has a number of parking areas, picnic sites, and attractions for visitors. The nearby river provides many excellent swimming locations as well.

The Avenue of the Giants was once part of U.S. Route 101 until a freeway bypass was built along the Northern California coast. The bypass became what is now 101. There are several campgrounds along the Avenue of the Giants, but it is by car that most people view it.

The Avenue of the Giants is situated just off a major highway, and has many natural and man-made attractions for visitors. One of the most famous attractions of the Avenue of the Giants is the Immortal Tree. Although not the oldest redwood in the forest, this large tree is over 950 years old, and is currently around 250ft tall. Originally it was much taller, but it has survived not only the ravages of time but also the 1964 flood of the area, and a direct lightning strike which removed the top 45 feet of the tree. It is from its age and the perceived hardiness of the tree that it received its name.

Like many other redwood forests, the Avenue of the Giants features a tree that visitors can drive their cars through. The hollow base of this giant tree has an opening carved on either side that allows a car to travel through it, much like a traditional road tunnel. Although it is located off the main road of the Avenue of the Giants, this tree is well sign-posted when driving south to north.

The tree house attraction at the Avenue of the Giants is an actual house that is partially built within a giant redwood tree. The front door and windows are clearly visible to passers by, and the rest of the house adjoins the rear of the tree in a more traditional style.

If you love the redwoods, be sure to visit the Avenue of the Giants along the Northern California coast.

 

Beaches of Northern CA ( 1 )

 

Black Sand Beach

This is a large, mostly west-facing, black sand beach with offshore reefs just north of the town of Shelter Cove. Black Sand Beach is a picturesque and relaxing beach. The black sand that covers the beach and has given the spot its name is very unusual. There are offshore reefs in this area that can create peeling lines of consistent and well-shaped surf.The winter months can bring big swell from the west and northwest. In general, the winter season requires skill and experience and isn’t the best time of year for novice surfers to visit. The summer months can mean smaller surf with fun south swells that are much less intimidating. Regardless of the season, this is definitely a beach worth checking out even when there’s not a visiting swell. Best Boards: Shortboard, longboard.
 


 

Beaches of Northern California ( 0 )

Surfing Black Sand Beach

This is a large, mostly west-facing, black sand beach with offshore reefs just north of the town of Shelter Cove. Black Sand Beach is a picturesque and relaxing beach. The black sand that covers the beach and has given the spot its name is very unusual.

There are offshore reefs in this area that can create peeling lines of consistent and well-shaped surf.The winter months can bring big swell from the west and northwest. In general, the winter season requires skill and experience and isn’t the best time of year for novice surfers to visit. The summer months can mean smaller surf with fun south swells that are much less intimidating. Regardless of the season, this is definitely a beach worth checking out even when there’s not a visiting swell. Best Boards: Shortboard, longboard.

 
 


 

Directions ( 0 )
Driving Directions to The Tides Inn

 

From the North:  Go South on 101 to Redwood Drive (exit 642).  Take that road south to the little town of Redway .  As soon as you get to Redway, you will see signs for Shelter Cove.  

From the South:  Go North on 101 to Garberville.  Take the second Garberville exit, go north and start looking for the Shelter Cove signs (it's about 2 miles to Redway). 

  The road to Shelter Cove is from Redway and is to the West, just North of the grocery store and looks like just a commercial/residential road (Briceland Road – turns into Shelter Cove Road), but soon turns into a windy, wooded road.  There is one section a mile or so in that is temporarily one-lane.  Drive slowly, use low gears, and move over if the crazy locals want to pass.  It's 23 miles - but plan on an hour.  There are forks in the road, but if you follow the yellow line, you won't get lost. Turn left at the stop sign at the end of the road and follow the road around toward the water.  You'll pass the lighthouse on your left.  Turn left on the first street (Surf Point), come down to the end and turn right into our driveway.  We're peaches 'n' cream (peach and off-white).  The office is the first door you'll see...  If you’re using a GPS, our address is 59 Surf Point, Shelter Cove (Whitethorn), CA 95589.  You cannot use your cell once you exit 101 (usually).  If your service is US Cellular or Verizon, you will be able to use your cell in the Cove. 

Enjoy the scenic beauty and please drive carefully.
It will take you approximately 45 minutes to make the drive.

 
A Map of the Area

Fishing the Northern CA Coast ( 0 )

Shelter Cove has long been a stopover for the discriminating private boater and the commercial salmon fisherman. The salmon fishing in Shelter Cove is amazing! There are many boat charters available to take you out for a fun-filled day of salmon fishing. Even if you don’t catch any salmon (which is very unlikely at Shelter Cove) you can still enjoy your day on the boat. If you like seafood, don’t just limit yourself to salmon fishing in Shelter Cove, however. At the end of the day you can see many fisherman Abalone diving along the shores of Shelter Cove.

You don’t have to be a fisherman to enjoy Shelter Cove though. One of the best parts of Shelter Cove is that it is relatively unknown. The portion of the Northern California coast that Shelter Cove is located on is virtually undisturbed. You can sit back and relax on the black sand beaches and enjoy the sun without being disturbed.

  • One of the Most Under-used Fishing Spots in California is Shelter Cove! 
  • With Some of the Best Variety of Fishing: Albacore, Halibut, Salmon, Rockcod, Lingcod, Crab and more!!! 
  • With a View and Beaches like no other.
  • With the smell of fresh air mixed with the Pine trees and Ocean breeze the view is from Spectacular to Romantic and not least of all Soothing for the Soul and Relaxing. 

The salmon like to hang just off Shelter Cove where the water depth drops from 100 ft. to 200 ft. or more, around 1 to 2 miles off the Red Whistle Buoy.

By yourself or with your loved one, take the time to take in the view. 

Hiking the Northern CA Coast ( 0 )

The Lost Coast Trail winds through the Kings Range Conservation Area and through Sinkyone Wilderness State Park. From the Mouth of the Mattole to Sinkyone, the area is dotted with campsites that are available just to hikers and others that would be close to a roadway and could be used by both hikers and auto campers. The campsites usually have a small charge for day use and over night camping. There is normally not much fuel at these sites to use for a fire. And one must check with the Honeydue or Thorn Fire stations for permission to have a fire. Water at some of the grounds is potable and at others camp grounds is not. You should take special care with the steam or run off, as cooking or drinking water. Toilets are available at the campgrounds in most cases. Where there are no toilets, one should bring along the camp shovel and use it correctly. Trash barrels are provided at most camp grounds, but there are some that you are expected to take the trash out with you. The trails or marked sometimes but vandalism and lack of funds leave others unmarked. Having a map is essential to navigating from one point to another if you are unfamiliar with this area. Even a road map would be better then nothing. Weather at the ocean is always a changing situation year around. But late fall and late spring can give unpredictable weather at times. Summer can be unpredictable, as to if there will be sun or not, but rain is very infrequent. Even in summer plan on chilly nights down near the ocean. Summers in the high mountains can be in the 100+ category;  water, and fire danger is a consideration. Always be aware that the areas we are talking of have mountain lions and bear that roam freely. Mountain lions range, as low as, the headlands, but prefer to be away from people. Bear range at the higher levels but both will come down into populated areas during drought conditions. (Store food stuffs correctly!)

Hiking on the lost coast is the first thing that the free spirit wants to do. The coast to the north of Shelter Cove provides a great place to hike, as a day trip or a more prolonged endeavor. Parallel to this stretch of beach known by the locals as "Big Black Sands Beach" are mostly public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management. The beach is difficult to walk on at times since it is composed of a round sand and each step sinks in at the heel giving a weighed step. But by slowing the pace and/or taking advantage of trails that lift you up onto the bluffs you can make time and preserve energy. There are trails that take off from the beach and lead you along the creeks and streams or up into the mountains and back into the wild public lands that surround Shelter Cove.

"Die hard" surfers will hike to an area to the north called, "Big Flat". It juts out into the Pacific about eight miles north of Shelter Cove and is the last piece of land you can see to the north from the southern end of Black Sands Beach. The surfing at "Big Flat" is supposed to be exceptional.  

Hiking the Northern CA Coast ( 1 )

The Lost Coast Trail winds through the Kings Range Conservation Area and through Sinkyone Wilderness State Park. From the Mouth of the Mattole to Sinkyone, the area is dotted with campsites that are available just to hikers and others that would be close to a roadway and could be used by both hikers and auto campers.

  • The campsites usually have a small charge for day use and over night camping.
  • There is normally not much fuel at these sites to use for a fire.
  • And one must check with the Honeydue or Thorn Fire stations for permission to have a fire.
  • Water at some of the grounds is potable and at others camp grounds is not. You should take special care with the steam or run off, as cooking or drinking water.
  • Toilets are available at the campgrounds in most cases. Where there are no toilets, one should bring along the camp shovel and use it correctly.
  • Trash barrels are provided at most camp grounds, but there are some that you are expected to take the trash out with you.
  • The trails or marked sometimes but vandalism and lack of funds leave others unmarked. Having a map is essential to navigating from one point to another if you are unfamiliar with this area. Even a road map would be better then nothing.
  • Weather at the ocean is always a changing situation year around. But late fall and late spring can give unpredictable weather at times. Summer can be unpredictable, as to if there will be sun or not, but rain is very infrequent. Even in summer plan on chilly nights down near the ocean. Summers in the high mountains can be in the 100+ category;  water, and fire danger is a consideration.
  • Always be aware that the areas we are talking of have mountain lions and bear that roam freely. Mountain lions range, as low as, the headlands, but prefer to be away from people. Bear range at the higher levels but both will come down into populated areas during drought conditions. (Store food stuffs correctly!)

Hiking on the lost coast is the first thing that the free spirit wants to do. The coast to the north of Shelter Cove provides a great place to hike, as a day trip or a more prolonged endeavor. Parallel to this stretch of beach known by the locals as "Big Black Sands Beach" are mostly public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management. The beach is difficult to walk on at times since it is composed of a round sand and each step sinks in at the heel giving a weighed step. But by slowing the pace and/or taking advantage of trails that lift you up onto the bluffs you can make time and preserve energy. There are trails that take off from the beach and lead you along the creeks and streams or up into the mountains and back into the wild public lands that surround Shelter Cove.

"Die-hard" surfers will hike to an area to the north called, "Big Flat". It juts out into the Pacific about eight miles north of Shelter Cove and is the last piece of land you can see to the north from the southern end of Black Sands Beach.

The surfing at "Big Flat" is supposed to be exceptional.  

History of Shelter Cove ( 0 )

Shelter Cove is located 40 miles north of Mendocino and 250 miles north of San Francisco and an hour's drive west of Garberville, CA. (although it is just 25 miles of winding road). It is so worth the time it takes to drive here. The views are truly breathtaking as far as your eyes can see both north and south.

The Cove Restaurant.

The Cove Restaurant was a “bohemian” kind of restaurant, I must say. It was appealing in its ambiance and delectable dishes, which is fortunate, because often it was the only place to go out for dinner. Since it was the only place to dine, it was also crowded. We went once, I recall, and had to wait an hour just to be served our drinks and have our order taken. Well, where else did we have to go on that rainy evening? We were in no hurry, but you are sort of at their mercy. The restaurant is an A-frame shape with a winding staircase inside. They provide fresh seafood and live music (on the weekends).

Since there were only one (or sometimes two, depending on the season) restaurants operating at any one time in Shelter Cove, we used to pack much of our own food and bring it with us. We also shopped at the (very) small general store in town. The market sells yummy hoagies and potato salad, coleslaw, etc along with T-shirts, postcards and some jewelry. For fun, we pinned one of our business cards up on the bulletin board outside the door to the market. When we came back about 8 months later, sure enough the business card was still there, faded and curled, but still there. Shelter Cove has at least two pay phones, believe it or not. Cell phone use here is somewhat limited because of its remote location.

Weather.

I have witnessed much of the extreme weather conditions that Shelter Cove has to offer. True enough, there can be warm, sunny days. We have also experienced ghastly weather, blowing, storming, drenching us to the bone, being typical of northern California coastal climates during the winter months.

The history of the Shelter Cove area.

I think one of the reasons the area has remained fairly small and unspoiled is the fact it is work to get to. There is basically one way in and one way out by road. The route into Shelter Cove is through the bustling burg of Garberville, off of 101. This is a scenic winding road that takes you down through Whitethorn. We once had a car and drove through the roads here. It is a beautiful drive with giant redwood trees on either side of the narrow two lane highway. The fragrant scent of pine trees reaches your nostrils and I couldn't help but think of Christmas trees while taking in deep breaths of fresh, cool air.

The big plane crash.

The town of Shelter Cove is an area, which had planned, we were told, to undergo a major development operation back in the 1960's. The developers and architects had come in with their maps and plans, laid the roadways and sewer system for housing developments, even began building second getaway homes for the wealthy and retired, when it all came to a sudden end. Tragically, in 1971, something went very wrong during their take-off and at the end of the runway, their DC-3 crashed into the ocean and killed 17 people on board. When we drove around one evening, it struck me as very eerie to see street after street and cul-de-sacs leading nowhere, empty except for the weeds and overgrowth now popping through the asphalt, now reclaiming the land that had once been sought for home development.

The fishing village.

We watched, fascinated as old and young salty dogs cleaned the fish they had caught that day with skilled hands that made it look so easy. Near the boat launch ramp, is an old repair garage. Behind that are a couple of rusty tractors and several small ancient boats that I doubt will ever be seaworthy again. (You can also hire boats to go out with an experienced fisherman.)

The nature and the beaches.

One of our absolute favorite things to do when we spend time in Shelter Cove is to take long walks. We always bring our camera too. Wildlife abounds here. The beaches have black sand. You can always count on seeing seals, walruses, and we even witnessed deer walking along the runway at dusk more than once. We also liked renting bikes to explore the area.

There are many large homes that stand empty for months during the year, because they function as second homes for their owners. The last time we visited, Shelter Cove still retained that small town charm, to be sure, but there had been changes since the first time I'd visited back way in 1991. There is now a small coffee shop (a Starbucks clone) that rents DVD's and videos; more real estate offices are popping up as well. The town pulled together recently and renovated the Cape Mendocino Lighthouse too, which is very pretty. The changes that are taking place are positive ones, and although I am glad for the local folks, I can’t help but be a little sad because that sleepy little town is now a busier place. Maybe all of those empty streets will one day be filled with new homes too.

Mario Machi.

First Man of Shelter Cove. Mario Machi and his two brothers came to Shelter Cove in the 1930's when they were eager young fishermen. They promoted business here because they rented out rooms and fishing boats. We had the pleasure to meet Mario a few times before he passed away in 1998. He was always out and about and always had a friendly greeting and smile for everyone. You'd swear he remembered you too. He even wrote a short book about the area he loved so much (“The Gem of the Lost Coast”) and we bought a copy.

Humboldt County ( 2 )

Shelter Cove

Shelter Cove is a small, secluded community in Southern Humboldt County at Point Delgado on California's "Lost Coast." Its setting is a grassy headland on one of the few flat areas along the King Range. The community is surrounded by parts of the King Range National Conservation Area with its 30 miles of restricted-access coastline.

Shelter Cove is proud and excited to be a major player in the restoration of the Cape Mendocino Lighthouse, which was moved from its site approximately 25 miles north of the city in November 1988 and now sits at its new location on Upper Pacific Drive in Shelter Cove. In 1999 the lighthouse was reassembled, painted and glass was installed. Built in 1866, the lighthouse served as a warning to mariners for nearly a century before being abandoned by the Coast Guard in 1951. The beacon was in extremely poor condition, and was even in danger of falling into the sea. The Cape Mendocino Lighthouse Preservation Society of Shelter Cove is pleased to be able to keep coastal history alive and to allow visitors access to this legacy. A lighthouse dedication is set for September 30, 2000.

Along with this exciting project, the cove offers outstanding fishing, hiking, backpacking, surfing, picnicking, beachcombing, golfing and other recreational activities for everyone. Among its facilities are an RV park and campground, two restaurants, lodging establishments, a cocktail lounge, coffeehouse, two general stores, a daylight airstrip and a boat launching ramp. Fishing licenses are available, as well as a charter boat service. There are picnic areas and easy access to the cove beach where visitors can swim, surf and explore black sand beaches.

Fishermen are drawn to Shelter Cove for its deep sea salmon fishing, ling and rock cod, red and black snapper, abalone, crab and shellfish. Surf fishing for perch and rock fish is good and surf netting is possible at Dead Man's Creek and the cove beach. Boats can be launched at a ramp in the cove. In calm water, skin-diving and abalone picking are good.

Good hiking trails and pack-in camps are found in the mountains surrounding the cove, including a trail to Kings Peak, the highest point on the continental U.S. shoreline with an elevation of 4,086 feet. There is also the Lost Coast Trail which follows the beach from the cove to the mouth of the Mattole River, 21 miles to the north. Many points along the trail are only passable at low tide, so bring a tide book. Several trails and campsites also exist in the Sinkyone Wilderness State Park to the south of Shelter Cove.

Shelter Cove has a long and intriguing history. An early mention is found in an 1855 article in the Humboldt Weekly that called it the best harbor on the coast, "with 20,000 acres of level prairie land surrounding the bay and gently ascending lands covered with spruce, pine, redwood, alder and other trees."

Directions: Shelter Cove can be reached from exits on Highway 101 at Garberville or Redway. From Redway, take the Briceland/Shelter Cove Road west toward Whitethorn. After the Whitethorn turnoff is passed the road begins to climb and then drops down to the coast.

Northern CA Redwoods ( 5 )

You will see some of the largest, oldest living things on earth by traveling through the parks where these Giant Redwoods live.  Shelter Cove Little Black Sands Beach

Drive Through Tree in Myers Flat

 

 

 

 

Pictures ( 0 )

Weddings

Whale Sightings

Click to play this Smilebox slideshow: The Tides Inn
 
Relax and Enjoy!
 

 

Wonderful Things Happen in Shelter Cove!!

Austin and Angela Get Engaged!
This was a surprise on the beach!

82 Pound Halibut caught by our guest,
Rusty Bechtold

Elk on our Golf Course - look at that Rack!!
Compliments of David and Glenna Rhoby

An August Sky

The Moon...  Ah-h-h
black sand beaches
Deer in the Ocean - Right Outside your Door
Alex and the Tidepools

More of Alex's Tidepools

A dead stringray on the beach.
Just a reminder that the ocean is a powerful force.



Black Sands Beach

Launching Area for Fishing Boats from the Cove

Mendocino Lighthouse...
A Beautiful Day!!



Huge Muscle Beds below our Inn

...Tidepools...Tidepools...Tidepools...

Jim & Gena - Happy Anniversary!!


Anniversary Party for a Fun Bunch!

A Great Family!!



The Avenue of the Giants
A Must-See Day-trip

Above the Clouds


One of Our Favorite Guests


One of Many Deer in the Area

 




 



  

Pelicans in formation
 
One of our guests, Claire, and her Prize Calico Perch


Elk on our Golf Course


Sea Lions on our Beach -
Compliments of our Guest, Katie Mathewson


A view from the Inn - A little like Camelot, don't you think?

Compliments of our guest,
Kathie Mathewson



Relax and watch from your balcony
Compliments of our guest,
Shane McBurnett

A view from your front door of our
Ice Plant in bloom

Cape Mendocino Lighthouse at Sunset


Tidepools...







A garage full of motorcycles

A Fishing Boat in the Cove

Sunset Looking back at the
The Tides Inn

Another Beautiful Sunset!













 


 

   


 


 

 


 


 


 

 


 

 

 

 

 


 


 

 
 

 



 

 


 



 

 

 

 


 









 







 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
 


 

 


 

 


 

Pilot Information ( 0 )

 

Pilot's Special

           PILOTS

* Make reservations

* Cancel because of weather

* No Charge

Go to AirNav.com for flight instructions, info about the area, and directions: 0Q5


 

Rooms & Rates ( 0 )

 

*Mini Suite $190.00 *Full Suite $215.00 *Suite Combo $380.00 * Standard Room $165.00

 

**All of our units are oceanfront and, as such, have stunning, unobstructed views of the ocean.

**All of our units have a microwave, refrigerator/freezer, toaster, hair dryer, and coffee pot.  

**You will receive a small welcome basket of assorted snacks to sate you while you check out the dining options in Shelter Cove. 

**Our oceanfront Mini-Suites are on the third floor. They have a gas fireplace in and balcony off the living room, a separate bedroom with king or queen bed, and a separate bathroom with tub. The sofa in living room converts to a comfortable queen bed.  These units are very nice for a couple's getaway but will sleep up to 4 adults.

**Our oceanfront Full-Suites are on the second (2) and first (1) floors. They have a fireplace in  and a balcony off the large living room; a separate oceanview king bedroom; a fully-appointed  kitchen; and a large bath with tub.  There is a comfortable queen wall bed  in the living room.  This large accommodation is great for longer stays and/or for guests who like the opportunity to make their own meals. These units will accomodate 4 guests and are very nice for families.

**The Suite Combo is a Mini Suite and a Full Suite that are connected by an interior stairway. The Suite Combo will sleep up to 8 adults.

**We also have a standard room with two full (double) beds.  It is on the first floor and has a nice deck, and beautiful views of the ocean.  OR - we have standard rooms with king beds.  One of these rooms is on the first floor and has a walk-in shower that is wheelchair accessible.  The other standard rooms are on the second floor.

**Check-in time is 3:00 p.m.

**Check-out time is 11:00 a.m. 

**Our rates are based on double occupancy.  Extra adults and children 12 and older are $15.00 each.

**$15.00 Premium for weekend nights (Friday and/or Saturday). 

**Occupancy Tax is an additional 12% of room charge.

**Our No pets & No smoking policies are strictly enforced. 

**Cancellation Policy: We require 72-hour advance notice for cancellations. Guests cancelling within 72 hours or less will be charged for each night we do not book the room.    

**Rates are subject to change


 

Specials ( 0 )

Winter Special

California  beaches
November through April
Stay two nights get the third night free!
(Excludes holidays)

waves on rocks
Winter at Sunset

Pilot's Special

 PILOTS
 *Make reservations
 *Cancel because of weather
 *No Charge
 Go to AirNav.com for flight instructions, info about the area, and directions. 0Q5

airport aerial view

Things to Do in Shelter Cove ( 7 )

 101 Things to Do

 

 

Paragliding

Day-use Airstrip

 

Golf Links

Cape Menocino Lighthouse

 

Hiking

Tide Pooling

 

Fishing

Avenue of the Giants

 

Ferndale, a Victorian Village

Photographer's dream

 

Whale Watching

Seal Watching

 

Abalone Diving

Wine Tasting


 

Tide Pools at Northern CA Coast ( 2 )

California boasts over 1,100 miles of coastline and with it, some of the world's richest tidal life. Cold, nutrient-rich waters and rocky shorelines provide the perfect habitat for hundreds of species of plants, from microscopic diatoms to huge seaweeds. The plants in turn, support a multitude of wildlife normally hidden beneath the waves. At first glance, the wave-swept rocks may seem void of life, but the rocky pools exposed only at the lowest tides contain a rich stew of plants and animals plastered so thickly together that very little of the rocks show. An amazing feat considering the harshness of this wave-battered environment.

Imagine the challenge of surviving surging waves, scouring sand and the drying sun at low tide. While you're trying to keep from getting bashed about in the surf, you must hunt for food, hide from enemies and reproduce. As you think of how you would survive the elements, consider how each tide pool animal has adapted to these harsh conditions. Some species like the barnacles and anemones permanently attach themselves to the rocks and wait for the waves to carry them food. Snails and seastars clamp down on the rocks during low tides and crashing waves, but move about in search of food at high tide. Soft-bodied sea slugs and fish tend to be the most active hunters and retreat to protected coves and deep water during storms and low tides. Part of the fun of exploring tide pools comes from trying to guess why the animals look and act as they do. Nowhere else on earth can you see such diverse methods of responding to this rugged world.

To be a good tide pooler, you must also be a good detective. On land, it's easy to tell a plant from an animal, or an animal from a rock. Not so in the tide pools, especially at low tide when animals clamp down to keep from drying. Many species are masters of disguise, using camouflage colors and shapes to hide in the pools. For those willing to poke and probe in the pools at low tide, a world of bizarre animals in a vast array of colors, textures and shapes awaits you.

Weddings at the Tides Inn ( 0 )

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Getting ready and getting there...
 

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The Bride with her Sister, Daughter, and Best Friend

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The Groom with Sons and Lots of Support

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Isn't She Beautiful??

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Even the Birds Came to Give Their Blessings

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There They Are - Do They Look Happy?

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The Whole Wedding Party

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Beautiful Shot from Our Second Floor

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The Music Made for a Good Time for All

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Beautiful Table Settings and View

And now for an informal wedding - beautiful, too.
This wedding took place in front of The Tides Inn, between two sets of rocks during a low tide.

 


The happy bride and groom


A little surprise when the couple got back from the dinner after the wedding


The cake. Beautiful and yummy, too

Whale Watching ( 2 )

WHALE WATCHING  

Whale Watching on the Lost Coast and at Shelter Cove,California is ae great mammoth beasts that crue young alves by their sides. My first encounter with California Grey Whale.

The California Grey whale migrates from as far south as the tip of Baja California Sur in Mexico and points along the Mexican coast including, Bahia de Ballenas, Bahia Magdalena, and the Lagoons near Guerrero Negro to the Bering Straits and points on north to Barrow Alaska. This migration starts in the luxuriantly rich food supplies available in the cold plankton filled waters in the northern reaches of North America and the Upper Asia continents. During the summer months the pods fill on the krill replenish the fat and build the energy levels of the pods for the migration south starting from the north in the late fall. The impregnated females start the migration by leading the organized pods south. Leaving the immature, unattached or rouge males to linger along behind. This helps to account for the long parade of whales that pass along the coast. After their arrival in southern latitudes they bear there new born. Some of the cows may actually give birth as far north as Oregon on the trip south. During the mild Mexican winter they suckle there young and build up their strength for the journey north. Some whales probably never make it all the way south before they are met with the first of the returning whales headed north again this is the main body of the northern migration that is more direct then the southern. The first big group is followed by females and their young calves heading back north along the surf line at times to provide food and protection from predators.

We see this spectacular event at Shelter Cove when in the early spring April thru June the whales arrive right off the rocks with there young. Raising and diving in the surf slowly moving north. Sometimes, as in the case of the mother and calf that I had seen on my first siting, they will stay in the area feeding for a week or two since the food supply is especially good here on the Lost Coast. The migrations as I have mentioned are not neatly defined as all inclusive. Larger and larger numbers of the Grey Whales prefer not to make the entire migration and hang around areas along the way with the body of the estimated 25000 (1996) whales scattered along the route. Some in California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia and Alaska waters.

Other baleen whale species have been reported to be in these waters from time to time is the:

Humped Back Whale.

They are mostly native to Hawaii and Alaska has migrated though these waters, but this migration pattern is not necessarily traditional. They have a general route of migration between Hawaii and Glacier Bay in Alaska.

Another whale seen along the Lost Coast is the:
Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus)

The blue whale is one of the largest animals ever to have lived on earth. It is almost as long as a Boeing 737 and is the largest of all cetaceans. Typical full-grown length about 82-85 feet Color: bluish-gray with grayish white patches. It has a small triangular dorsal fin (apx 12 in.), located toward the end of its back. Ranges from tropical to subarctic seas around the world.

Feeding, Migration and Population

Blue whales feed almost exclusively on krill and pelagic red crabs. Whenever they spend an extended period of time in a given area, it is usually due to an ample supply of these organisms. Blue whales usually occur alone or in pairs. Large groups have been reported where prey are abundant, particularly off of Mexico.

Studies suggest that Blue whales probably migrate in a pattern that is similar to that of the California Grey whale. They can be seen off the west coast of Baja California in large numbers in April. They appear in the area again in October, but have not been reported between November and January. Catches of blue whales from British Columbia shore stations peaked in June and September, suggesting a northward movement past Vancouver Island in spring and a southward shift in autumn.

Not much is known of the total population of these giants. Because there has been a progressively more frequent number of sightings of the blue whales each year off California. The best guess using current data as been around 2,134 near California in the mid 90's.

 

 

Wine Tasting Northern CA ( 2 )

Southern Humboldt County

  • BRICELAND VINEYARDS
  • ELK PRAIRIE VINEYARD
  • RIVERBEND CELLARS
  • WHITETHORN WINERY

Northern Humboldt County

  • MOONSTONE CROSSING WINERY
  • FIELDBROOK WINERY
  • ROBERT GOODMAN WINES
  • HEIDRUN MEADERY
  • LLUVIA WINERY
  • OLIVEIRA WINERY
  • OLD GROWTH CELLARS

Northeast Humboldt County

  • WINNETT VINEYARDS
  • COATES VINEYARDS
  • DOGWOOD ESTATE WINERY
  • CABOT VINEYARDS